Category Archives: Common Action

The Annual Wage Review 2017-18: From Marriage Equality to “Economic Inequality”.

By Don Sutherland (March 16th, 2018)

The Annual Wage Review:  update

This week the Annual Wage Review (AWR18) run by the Fair Work Commission (FWC) that sets new minimum rates of pay moved to a new stage. March 13th was deadline day for submissions from “interested parties”. These include employer organizations, governments, and, for workers, the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU).

And, the ACTU launched its 6 week advertising campaign to highlight general and some specific aspects of the “broken rules” of Australia’s Fair Work Act 2009 (FWA09). (Click here.)

Critically, this advertising campaign will lead into days of workers’ action being planned for May.

We also learned that the unregulated salaries of the Chief Executive Officers of Australia’s top 100 corporations pushed on average well above $5 million per year. (page 12.) These characters are not required to apply for a pay increase to the FWC.

Many of them supervise the attacks on the pay and conditions of their own workforce, using the “broken rules” of the FWA09, and their company’s strategy to pay little or no tax, using the “broken rules” of the tax system.

Between now and April 9th the parties can study the submissions of all of the other parties, and any new economic data, and by April 9 present counter submissions. (For more on the AWR process click here.)

Its all very polite and loved so much by those in “the IR club”. The process is designed to exclude the workers who are most affected by it from exerting any real influence. That is, unless they or a good part of them decide to defy the process.

The claims: what we now know

The submissions have now been posted to the FWC web page (click here) that provides the detail of the progress of the Review. There is a good summary of the main claims here. (Also, Caroline Pryor and I on “Workers Radio” . Radio Skid Row, discussed the claims today: click here.)

The ACTU claim is to lift the minimum rate of pay by $50 per week. This is a 7.2% increase for low paid workers. Make no mistake, there is no one else going in to bat for them like the Australian union movement.

This is a claim made for all workers, not just those who are union members. If you are not a member its time to join. If you know someone who is not a member its time to have a serious talk with them. You can help them join directly at this ACTU page: click here.

For the employers, arguably the most influential employer organization, the Australian Industry Group, wants a paltry $12 per week increase on the minimum rate and $14.60 for the lowest award rates. That’s a 1.8% increase, which is less a than the current inflation rate. In other words, a pay cut. No surprise there.

One of the retail employer organizations wants a zero increase. The other concedes a 1.9% increase, as does the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

The federal government and the ALP did not propose any specific increase but their proposals were quite different.

The Federal government wants the smallest possible increase and argues that really wages should only increase naturally, that is, their genuflection to the “trickle-down effect”.

The ALP, in opposition, with its nose to the federal election breeze as you would expect, endorses a decent increase but one which is “economically responsible”. If the Commission grants $15 per week as “economically responsible” would the ALP accept that? What would their members say? (The Greens and One Nation have not made submissions or proposals. They both should be challenged on that.)

The arguments against the ACTU’s claim

The union activist army must grow in number and also lift their ability to defeat the employers’ propaganda against the ACTU claim.

So far, in the public arena, these are general “arguments”, and say that the claim is 4 times the inflation rate; will destroy jobs; and harm low paid workers.

These will be sharpened and added to in the weeks ahead. Murdoch’s media will be the prime vehicle to spin them.

They will have to be addressed by the union army of activists in their day to communications with workers, including those who are not yet unionised but who can be attracted to the struggle. The ACTU Submission does deal with each of them. And there is also this: click here.

How can low paid workers win? Business as usual or a defiant mobilization? Or leave it to Bill Shorten’s ALP as a new government?

We need a new strategy based on defiance and mobilization. This cannot be a once off, one year exercise. This year’s mobilization, if there is to be one, must pave the way for 2019.

The ACTU itself says that this year’s claim is step 1 towards the creation of a “Living Wage” as the new minimum pay rate. The aim is to establish a minimum rate about 2/3 of the national minimum wage. That would mean about an $80 per week increase this year. Clearly, this year’s strategy must be run as a platform for a more determined and bigger effort next year, no matter who is in government.

From the past 20 years of experience we know that the “obedient” strategy that abides by “the broken rules” is a failure. And, the AWR process in the FWA09 is one of the most broken parts of it. (See sections 134 and 285.) On equal pay the FWC has interpreted the “broken rules” such that important direct arguments on why and how to narrow the notorious gender gap on wages are rejected. (See the ACTU Submission here.)

This strategy is built around polite and strongly researched submissions (still important), orderly advocacy, a few “real” low paid workers as supplicant witnesses (a bit like Dickens’ Oliver Twist asking for more), on line petitions, a dose of social media outrage, and sometimes small scale symbolic protests.

In effect this past strategy concedes to poverty and inequality. On its own IT DOES NOT WORK. It is for dreamers only, those who love court processes, economic “debate”, and custom and practice. Such dreamers could listen to this: “The Basic Wage Dream”.  (It’s an old song with a 21st century meaning. There is a reference to “Nugget” Coombes. He was the governor of the Reserve Bank at the time.)

We all know that enterprise bargaining is falling apart both for workers who have such Agreements and for those who don’t. It is no longer a serious strategic option for any  workers, let alone for the 21st century working class.

The sparkling leadership and campaigning savvy of ACTU Secretary, Sally McManus will not alone win this claim for low paid workers.

McManus needs a much stronger movement along with her than we are currently seeing.

The core spirit of that movement must be the “defiance” that she started talking about just on a year ago in that first memorable interview on “The 7.30 Report”. She has often emphasized it since as the union outlook that has achieved all of the great gains for workers in the past.

It’s time to shift “defiance” from a word with emotional cache to a real mobilization.

Can the Australian union activist “army” deliver real defiance that attracts the low paid and their allies and strike a hard blow against inequality?

Last year the Australian union movement played a highly visible and leading role in the successful campaign for marriage equality. We saw the vibrant energy and campaigning skills of the cohort of union organisers and active delegates and members who have become active in recent years.

It confirmed their very strong grasp of discrimination politics, the meaning and manifold impact of discrimination, and a very clear reminder that the working class includes a significant cohort of gay, lesbian and trans workers, who have vital relationships with “straight” workers as mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, friends and so on.

This campaign strengthened gay workers, educated “straight” workers, neutralized opposition to and prejudice against gay workers, and found collective public actions that all parts of the working class could connect to.

The middle level, newly emerging union leaders – officials, organizers, communications officers, job delegates, active members – showed in that fight against a particular form of discrimination what they are capable of.

Can they reproduce that real potential in a wages campaign? Can the mid level activist “army” get as outraged by the increasing rate of exploitation?

At the moment there is no real sign that they can.

As strong as this part of our movement are on “discrimination politics” they are somewhat weak on “exploitation”, and not showing any sign yet of the same levels of movement wide clarity and energy as last year’s anti discrimination campaign.

The next 6 weeks leading to May is a chance to start changing that.

Because that’s how we build the pressure from below that is needed to win a much better result in this year’s wage claim, much closer to the ACTU’s claim that has ever before been achieved. Luke Hilikari, Secretary of the Victorian Trades Hall Council, gets close to the point here.

Such a mobilization is what is needed for the millions of workers who are dependent on the AWR for their wage increase. These include those who are paid at the minimum rate, those who are underpaid by employers who thieve their wages from them (a business model in 21st century Australian capitalism) and those who are paid a little bit (bit not too much) above the minimum rate, but not enterprise agreement rates that tend to be much higher.

If you wish to use your own initiative to learn more about the formal process, and also see the submissions as they are posted, you can start here: https://www.fwc.gov.au/awards-agreements/minimum-wages-conditions/annual-wage-reviews/annual-wage-review-2017-18 .

Advertisements

“Solidarity Forever”: Robots, Workers, and Profitability

Don Sutherland (March 2018)

Everyone I know with any form in the Australian union movement loves the song “Solidarity Forever”. The song includes these 2 lines:

They have taken untold millions that they never toiled to earn 

But without our brain and muscle not a single wheel can turn

What do these words mean for real working lives in our times?

This is a relevant question amid the new wave of production and other technologies, including robots and “cobots”.

The introduction of robots and other automated or semi automated machines into work processes is nearly absolutely controlled by employers. The Fair Work Act 2009 prohibits new technology like robots from being a negotiated issue in enterprise bargaining. It is wrong but it is simply unquestioned that employers should have this absolute control and that, therefore, nothing of any import can go wrong.

The second point is that the introduction of robots and other automated machines is a capital investment. There is a consequence to this that can only be fully grasped by workers and their organisations by chewing over those beloved words in “Solidarity Forever”, and understanding their 21st century economic meaning from the standpoint of workers.

Without getting too technical about it, what those words say is that all accumulated and new wealth derives from the application of human labour by workers.

Therefore, from the standpoint of workers, capital investment does not create wealth, it is a part of the total wealth that is created by workers through their labour. Specifically, it is a part of the total “profit” that is taken by the boss after paying wages and associated benefits to workers. It’s application is intended to enable employer-controlled workers produce new wealth that can be expropriated.

Commonly, workers are “taken on” to use tools and machines in factories and other work sites, to transform raw material from nature, or partially finished products, into goods for exchange and sale in the market place. Nowadays these include algorithms embedded in software or that enable the function of machines. (Most of these algorithms originate in the knowledge and thought of workers that is acquired and applied during their work process …. a separte discussion.)

Connecting the dots: robots – investment – human labour – total profit – profitability

The product (or service) must be useful but to contain money wealth it must also be “saleable”: that is, it has a use value and an exchange value intertwined within it. Out of the sale, the human labour put in leads to a total money value that is new wealth, and inside that is total profit, and also total wages. The total wages must be less than the total value that has been created by the worker. The process of work is in its essence a process of exploitation of workers by their employers.

The owners of the machines etc, and for set periods every day also of the labour potential of the workers, obsesses over whether what they have taken, the “total profit”, is enough relative to “their” investment that has been made possible in the first place by the labour of the workers they have employed.

It’s hard to think of an employer who is not obsessed with his / her profit, especially relative to the investment made, and in relationship to their competitor(s). (Unfortunately and incorrectly, the importance of profits, and profitability, is skated over or ignored even by most ”modern” labour economists.)

In dollar terms, profitability is shown by the total profit relative to the investment put into it. As an equation, profitability = total profit / capital investment.

So, what does this mean for the introduction of “robots” or “cobots “?

Robots are a capital investment by the employer, that seek to reduce labour costs and increase profits.

They are meant to make an impact on productivity: the same or more output relative to the quantity of human labour hours required to make it happen. However, in contradiction, they are also an immediate and longer term threat to profitability, the primary obsession of every employer.

With robots the labour time of fewer workers is necessary to produce the total wealth that includes the profit share and the (reduced) wages share, thus the proportion of capital investment increases relative to the input of workers, and to total profit.

For example, in one “moment”, profitability might mean total profit of 150 units divided by total capital investment of 300 units. Profitability equals 0.5. In the next “robot moment” that follows, the new capital investment increases relative to the human labour hours required (hopefully, putting aside breakdowns for the moment). So 150 units is divided by, say, 320. Profitability falls.

This is a tendency, it is not absolute. To reduce or prevent the tendency, wages and associated labour costs must be driven down no matter what the productivity.

This is why the Fair Work Act 2009 is working well for employers. It provides employers with those controls across the economic system. Thus, under 21st century capitalism, there is no logic that enables it to provide for reduced working hours in general while improving and equalizing the standard of living. To make that happen would require more universal and more powerful workers’ struggles through their unions, or in other ways.

This is a real dilemma for employers (and their champions): in 21st century capitalism (just like all capitalism before it) increasing the productivity of labour through more automated machines – robots – tends to reduce the profitability that all employers crave, and may even cause or hasten a renewed economic crisis that causes more unemployment and income security for the 90% plus.

But that’s the “logic” of a capitalist system. Production is not for social needs and values but to provide profitability and the accumulation of wealth for the minority who own and control the machines. In this system robots and “cobots” drive more insecurity.

Interim and ultimate solutions?

If you have a problem with this logic, then “it’s time” to cease the hypocrisy of singing those key words in “Solidarity Forever”.

More seriously, “solutions” like the “universal basic income” will be naïve and ultimately impractical.

Nevertheless, the real potential of automation does lie in reducing and sharing more equally productive working time.

The new leisure time that goes with that must be rooted in zero poverty and shared access to a bounty of socially and personally enriching activities. However, for that to be realised the 90 per cent, or a much bigger part of it, must take the necessary actions in support of the specific demands towards replacing with their collective selves the current owners of the machines and the systems that produce the 21st century necessities of life.

It’s worth looking at what the Corbyn and Sanders movements are coming up with in this light (and others in other parts of the world). And what the ACTU, the ALP and the Greens have to say about it. For me, that’s for another time and a good deal more reading and discussion, some of which might be found in the submissions to the current Senate Enquiry into the Future of Work.

Australia’s Penal Powers for the 21st Century

White Australia was born as a penal colony. And throughout its history since there have been plenty of laws that fine, impose financial damages and lock up both the original inhabitants of the land and the working people of all nations who came here to make a living. Those laws swing into play whenever landowners and employers needed a government instrument to protect their profit making and wealth accumulation from the collective action of aboriginal communities and their supporters, and also combinations of workers whether members of unions or not.  (For more on this read Jack Hutson’s From Penal Colony to Penal Powers.)

This story (click here) describes how Labor’s Fair Work Act of 2009 replicates that history so that it systematically prevents workers from exercising their collective power in the twenty first century.

Some of us who have been around for a long time know very well that there is NO END to the hypocrisy of employers when it comes to the exercise of their power. Employers like Bluescope Steel, in their own right and through their associations like the AIGroup, AMMA, and the Business Council of Australia, constantly whinge about the role of outside third parties in industrial relations.For them, “outside third party interference”means unions, especially those that coordinate effective worker action across industries, and a Fair Work Commission with genuine democratic powers to ensure that workers human rights to organize and take collective action are protected.

But, they made sure, when they negotiated the Fair Work Act to replace Howard’s Workchoices in 2008-9, they kept and re-energized that extra third party power that would punish workers for exercising the only power they have – collective industrial action. And, what is more, new ALP negotiators and certain (not all) union leaders let them have it.

What we see here, as we have seen in other disputes, is the PENAL PROVISIONS OF THE TWENTY FIRST CENTURY.

The penal provisions of the 20th century were neutralized in big disputes through the 1960’s that culminated with the national strike when Tramway Union official Clarrie O’Shea was jailed for refusing to pay fines imposed by the courts because union members were taking industrial action in defiance of the so-called “bans clauses” of the day.

The industrial strategy that led to that great union and democratic victory was ten years in the making.

The Australian workers of the twenty first century need a strategy that defeats the penal powers of the twenty first century. It is all about a deeper meaning of democracy than the very limited form that too many of us are sort of comfortable with these days.

Electing a genuine reforming Labor government backed up by the Greens and genuine pro worker and democratic independents to get rid of these undemocratic industrial laws will make a difference.But this was never on the radar in recent Federal elections.

So, that will not happen unless it is part of a conscious strategy that creates a massive and independent movement of workers that makes it impossible for Labor and Green politicians to dodge their responsibilities.

Tom Uren – outstanding Labor stalwart, a great man of the people

One of my Adelaide friends, Andy Alcock has written a fine in memoriam for the late Tom Uren. He has given me permission to post it here:

VALE: TOM UREN – A COURAGEOUS POLITICIAN & A CHAMPION FOR JUSTICE & HUMAN RIGHTS

Tom Uren was one of the greatest politicians Australia ever had.

I first came across him at Vietnam rallies when I lived in Sydney in the early 1970s. He was a very powerful speaker – eloquent, articulate,
persuasive, rational and warm.

Tom was very sincere, totally opposed to human rights abuses committed against all people and strongly on the side of those who suffered
tyranny. This is why he supported the Vietnamese, Cambodians and Laotians, the East Timorese and the West Papuans.

Yes, he was a supporter of left and progressive politics. To him, this meant following the politics of social justice, human rights, equality for
all, fairness between nations and caring for the environment.

At a time when most of the ALP had sold out the East Timorese, he was one of a few who supported the liberation struggle of our former,
valiant WW2 allies. Others in that group, of course, included Richie Gun and Ken Fry.

Because of his strong support, CIET (SA) – now AETFA SA, asked Tom to officially open the “East Timor, Australia and the Region Conference”.
This conference was an international one and it was organised by CIET SA and held at Adelaide University in 1979. Tom made a great contribution.

Frequently, he spoke out about what was happening in Timor and always gave support to activists working in solidarity with the East Timorese.

I see that Bill Shorten has described Tom as a giant in the ALP, which is true. But, I also remember being at an East Timor Activists Conference in
the early 1980s as the right was becoming far more dominant in the ALP. At a party organised by Tom to which he invited conference delegates, I
remarked to an ALP staffer that he must be very proud working with people like Tom Uren. His response was that Tom was a fool for supporting East
Timor and that he was working with others in the ALP to get rid of old fools like him!

Is it any wonder that the East Timorese got very little support from the ALP leadership during their struggle? It was rather ironic that towards the end
of their struggle, it was Laurie Brereton, a key figure in the NSW right of the ALP who turned around the Party’s policy on this issue. Sadly, this did
not follow through and when the ALP took office in 2007, there was no support from ALP MPs to reverse the “Liberal” Party’s policy to refuse to
recognise the UN Convention of the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) in relation to Timor-Leste – although Australia recognises the UNCLOS principle with
NZ and the Solomons. This has resulted in Australia taking a lot of the oil and gas from Timor-Leste’s half of the Timor Sea.

Tom Uren always stood for human decency in relations between people and was totally opposed to racism.

Even though he was a victim of the Japanese military during WW2, he did not harbour anti Japanese sentiments. Tom had been captured in West
Timor and sent to work on the infamous Thai Burma railway as a POW and later he worked in a slave camp in Japan not far from Nagasaki, where
he saw the atomic bombing of Nagasaki from a distance.

During the official recognition of the 60th anniversary of the end of WW2, I saw Tom being interviewed at Hellfire Pass, a part of the railway in
Thailand.

The interviewer asked him what the conditions were like. Tom’s reply was that it was like hell on earth.

“We were expected to pick and shovel through solid rock to make this cutting. We worked long hours on extremely meagre rations. Many of the men
were extremely sick. A huge number had dysentery and they were literally shitting their lives away. There was virtually no medication for the sick. I
saw men on many occasions drop dead while they were on the job.”

The interviewer then asked Tom what he though about Japanese people because of his experiences. His answer was: I hated every last one of them
and I would not have cared if they had been all wiped out!”

He was then asked if he still had the same attitude. His answer was a definite “No!” Tom then went on to say that, “Í did not keep that opinion for long.
Later, I was transferred to a slave camp in Japan. There I met Japanese political prisoners. These people had the courage to oppose Japanese
fascism on its own grounds. They were very courageous people. They were my brothers. They were my comrades. Many people who harbour ill-will to
all Japanese people because of WW2 do not understand one important fact. And that is that during WW2, we were not fighting the Japanese people,
we were fighting Japanese fascism and there is a great difference.”

His analysis of the conflict between Australia and Japan avoided the racism against all Japanese that the Bruce Ruxton’s analysis embraced.

Because of his experiences during WW2, Tom became a devoted peace activist and was opposed to nuclear weapons and the nuclear industry.
His quest for social justice led him to be a strong advocate for socialism.

Tom Uren was a giant physically, but a gentle one. He was also a boxer, but more importantly, he used his strength and energy to fight for a fairer and
safer world.

Farewell, Comrade Tom. You will never be forgotten.

Andrew (Andy) Alcock
Information Officer
Australia East Timor Association SA Inc

Common Action to Oppose the first budget of the Abbott- Hockey / Business Council Alliance

Common Action, starting in Sydney, is trying bring together the dozens of points of opposition to the Australian neo-liberal Agenda of the Abbott government. And out of that develop a common, comprehensive and independent alternative economics and programme.

For more on Common Action click here and also follow them at their Facebook page and Twitter account.

As part of their actions they are organizing a post budget activists meeting, details as follows:

Wednesday May 21, 6.30pm-8pm,
Sydney Mechanics School of Arts,
280 Pitt St, Sydney.
6.15pm for a 6.30pm start
$5

What an excellent idea!

We use to do this in Adelaide in the 70’s and it was a great opportunity for young activists to learn about the political economy of budgets, especially how to analyze a taxation or spending decision (or proposal) through the prism of what it would mean for working people, the unemployed, women, ethnic communities and so on.

Those post budget sessions analyzed the Liberal budgets of the Liberal Party’s Fraser governments.

The sessions and analysis was led by political economists who were committed to plain language and working class oriented perspectives. Economics was thus demystified and turned into the common property of workers and other activists who had not gained either secondary or post secondary economic learning opportunities.

The contributors ranged from Keynesian and the more powerful critical analysis of independent Marxist views. However, there was practically nothing in the line of ecological perspectives. Women activists insisted, sometimes but not always with support of men, that the specific discrimination against women in budget decisions, be brought into the analysis.

After a few years these events waned but not before a new popular economic concept evolved: the social wage. The social wage described the connected impact on the standard of living of BOTH the industrial wage (the outcome of industrial, union led wage bargaining) and taxation / government spending, ie the social wage. We could see therefore, that in the dominant framework of Australian capitalism, the possibility that industrial wage gains could be nullified by a bad outcome in the social wage, mainly delivered in budgets Federal and state level).

The connections between inequality, the industrial wage and the social wage were described in an outstanding pamphlet: Australia Ripped Off. Australia Ripped Off was produced by the National Council of then Amalgamated Metal Workers and Shipwrights Union (now the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union). Its foremost author was the recently late Ted Wilshire from the unions National Research Office.  (Australia Ripped Off followed close behind an earlier pamphlet, Australia Up Rooted, that dealt with the impact on manufacturing industry of the biggest mining boom (up till then) in Australian history. Australia Up Rooted sets the standard in Australia for plain language economic education and learning for workers. It featured the wonderful cartoons of Bruce Petty.)

There is an opportunity for this revived form of activist learning re-ignite this class based, critical analysis of the Budget, connect that to what is happening to the finance sector, and integrate a strong environmental / ecological dimension. We lay, then, a foundation for a strategy that can eat away at the dominant economic messages of neo-liberal capitalism.

On this point, we who attend must demand that this is what the Common Action organizers provide: pressure from below can prevent the tendency for economic analysis that is soft and founded on assumptions that accept the dominant economic framework.

The system, 21st century capitalism, is founded in two interacting and mutually depend exploitations: the exploitation of most humans by a minority, and the exploitation of NATURE by that same minority. Associated with this, the system can at best offer only a very stunted form of democracy, that is, a somewhat compromised parliamentary democracy.

Finally, we can – collectively – build a coherent and unifying ALTERNATIVE political economic dynamic: both in policy and also strategy for that policy and its underpinning principals to challenge and become dominant. The potential for this exists in the dozens of campaigns that are points of resistance already to the dominant destructive momentum that is in our face every day.

These resistance campaigns are fragmented but they can be brought together and harnessed in a new and dynamically democratic alternative. We then have class based struggle happening again in a 21 st century form, just as it is forming in many other places around the world.